Psychtreatment.Com

Home                            About Us                         Contact Us                       Website Map

Information

 

 

 

 

Home

 

 

 

Alzheimer's

 

Articles of Interest:

Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's Treatment

Alzheimer's Disease Prevention

Alzheimer's Disease: Use it or lose it

Alzheimer's Diagnosis

Alzheimer's Cause and Prevalence

 

 

Psychology

 

Topics of Interest:

 

 

 

ADD/ADHD

Addiction Recovery

Alcohol Abuse

Alzheimer's

Anger

Antidepressants

Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia

 

 Treatment

 

Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety Disorder Symptoms

Anxiety Information

Anxiety Medication

Bipolar

Bulimia Nervosa

Clinician Articles and Websites 

Depression

Depression Medication

 

Drug Treatment

 

Eating Disorders

Geriatric

 Life Coaching

Links

Major Depression:

Marital Therapy 

Mental Health Symptoms and Diagnosis

Mood Disorders

 Pain Management:

Panic Attacks

Senior Citizen Resources

Website Map/All Articles

  

Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type Symptoms and DSM-IV Diagnosis

Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type Symptoms and Diagnosis Overview:

Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type symptoms and diagnostic criteria follow below. While some of these Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type  symptoms may be recognized by family, teachers, legal and medical professionals,  and others, only  properly trained mental health professionals (psychologists, psychiatrists, professional counselors etc.) can or should even attempt to make a mental health diagnosis. Many additional factors are considered in addition to the Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type  symptoms in making proper diagnosis, including frequently medical and psychological testing considerations. This information on Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type  symptoms and diagnostic criteria are for information purposes only and should never replace the judgment and comprehensive assessment of a trained mental health clinician. 

 

Diagnostic criteria for Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type

A. The development of multiple cognitive deficits manifested by both

(1)       memory impairment (impaired ability to learn new information or to recall previously learned information)

(2)       one (or more) of the following cognitive disturbances:

(a)       aphasia (language disturbance)

(b)       apraxia (impaired ability to carry out motor activities despite intact motor function)

(c)       agnosia (failure to recognize or identify objects despite sensory function)

(d)       disturbance in executive functioning (i.e., planning, organizing, sequencing, abstracting)

B. The cognitive deficits in Criteria Al and A2 each cause significant impairment in social or occupational functioning and represent a significant decline from a previous level of functioning.

C. The course is characterized by gradual onset and continuing cognitive decline.

D. The cognitive deficits in Criteria Al and A2 are not due to any of following:

(1) other central nervous system conditions that cause progressive deficits in memory and cognition (e.g., cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, subdural hematoma, normal-pressure hydrocephalus, brain tumor)

 (2) systemic conditions that are known to cause dementia (e.g., hypothyroidism, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency, niacin defi­ciency, hypercalcemia, neurosyphilis, HIV infection)           

(3) substance-induced conditions

E. The deficits do not occur exclusively during the course of a delirium

F. The disturbance is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (e.g., Major Depressive Disorder, Schizophrenia).

Code based on type of onset and predominant features: 

With Early Onset: if onset is at age 65 years or below

290.11 With Delirium: if delirium is superimposed on the dementia

290.12 With Delusions: if delusions are the predominant feature

290.13 With Depressed Mood: if depressed mood (including presentations that meet full symptom criteria for a Major Depressive Episode) is the predominant feature. A separate diagnosis of Mood Disorder Due to a General Medical Condition is not given.

290.10 Uncomplicated: if none of the above predominates in the current clinical presentation 

With Late Onset if onset is after age 65 years

290.3 With Delirium: if delirium is superimposed on the dementia

290.20 With Delusions: if delusions are the predominant feature

290.21 With Depressed Mood: if depressed mood (including presentations that meet full symptom criteria for a Major Depressive Episode) is the predominant feature. A separate diagnosis of Mood Disorder Due to a General Medical Condition is not given.

290.0 Uncomplicated: if none of the above predominates in the current clinical presentation

Recommend this Page on Google Plus 

Google
 
Web www.Psychtreatment.Com
Mental Health Diagnosis - DSM-IV Diagnosis and Codes: In Alphabetical Order

Psychiatric Medication

Celexa 

Effexor

 Elavil

Lexapro

Luvox

Paxil

Pristiq


Ads by Google

Copyright © 1999    [Psychtreatment.com].    All rights reserved.   Revised: November 05, 2016     636-300-9922